Why 12-Step Recovery Isn’t Right for Everyone

Drug TreatmentThere are many who praise the benefits of 12-step recovery programs; for those who do not find sobriety through 12-step meetings there are other more effective options available these days.

While Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous has become a staple among those in search of recovery, these 12-step recovery programs do not effectively treat addiction for most of those who attend. Drug courts mandate attendance to meetings, doctors recommend groups to their patients and “recovering” addicts continue to sing the praises of these self-help groups. Since its formation in the 1930’s AA has become deeply engrained among most American’s as the path to sobriety. However, their low success rate of five to ten percent has many in the field of addiction recovery questioning just how effective this form of addiction rehabilitation really is.

For the remaining ninety percent of individuals who do not benefit from AA or NA, their recovery never fully takes place. They are left struggling on their own; those who are lucky find alternative rehab programs to truly handle and treat their recovery needs. The premise behind AA and NA is that if the steps are followed to completion by the recovering individual they will succeed. If they fail, it is the individual who has fallen short, not the 12-step program. This leaves the recovering person feeling insecure and out of control in managing their sobriety.

The greatest gains for many who find success through these types of programs are from the camaraderie they receive during the meetings and from the support of their sponsor. While these meetings foster a supportive environment where the recovering individual is surrounded by likeminded individuals, it is really more of a “brotherhood” than a treatment program. For some, the structure and supportive environment during meetings and time with their sponsor is what they need to end their addition. Unfortunately, the majority of addicted individuals are unable to stop using simply by being around likeminded individuals and need actual treatment to handle and address their addiction problem.

The ninety percent who do not achieve lasting sobriety through 12-step meetings will need to pursue other forms of recovery to treat their addiction. By enrolling in a long-term inpatient or residential treatment center they will have the time, safe environment and resources they require to truly put their addiction behind them. These types of programs are highly effective at ending addiction because they assess the individual’s addiction problem, create a workable plan on how to treat their physical and psychological addiction and have measures in place to encourage the recovering individual to remain in treatment. With AA or NA, the individual can come and go as they please choosing to attend meetings or not to. When enrolled in an inpatient or residential treatment program the recovering person resides at the treatment facility around the clock to ensure their continued sobriety and focus on their recovery.

An Alternative Approach

One such long-term residential program with exceptional success rates for ending addiction to drugs and alcohol is Narconon Fresh Start. With treatment centers in Colorado, Texas, Nevada and Southern California they have a variety of locations to choose from to handle you or your loved one’s recovery needs. As an alternative and unique approach to addiction recovery, program participants overcome their addiction issues in a drug-free environment. Entirely holistic, the Narconon Fresh Start drug rehab program delivers a natural approach to addiction rehabilitation through their drug-free withdrawal process, New Life Detoxification Program and Life Skills Courses. Graduates of the program have no need for drug replacement medications, attending 12-step meetings or continued counseling. They have truly become rehabilitated during their enrollment in the program and come away with a sense of self-control and personal responsibility for their sobriety.

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